All posts by ian80

It made more money than James Bond!

British SitcomsNew Year, new exciting 101 Films feature! Lewis and I have come up with yet another 101 Films podcast.

We’re becoming like a crisp/chip company with all our various ‘flavours’. Joining our standard podcast (the Ready Salted, if we’re going to stick with the crisp flavour analogy), our Specials (Salt and Vinegar) and our Extras (Cheese and Onion) is the Movie Marathon (erm… BBQ?).

In the Movie Marathons Lewis and I will watch several films in one go all based around a theme. Our first is on a subject that has popped up surprisingly often on our podcasts – British sitcoms turned into films. After much debate, with so many to pick from (see here for a full list), we decided to work our way through Till Death Do Us Part, On The Buses, Dad’s Army, Are You Being Served? and The Likely Lads.

Now, I’ll be honest dear listener, a couple of these we didn’t make it through as they were so, so poor. But there were also some real gems, as well as a few surprises. Enjoy!

If our Movie Marathon has piqued your interest in these films, you can buy The British Comedy Collection on DVD (all 12 discs of it!) from Amazon by clicking on the link (and we get a little bit of cash if you do – thanks in advance).

Anyway, without further ado, let us present our feature presentation:

Click here to download and listen on your MP3 player of choice:

101 Films Movie Marathon 01 – British Sitcoms

Click below to subscribe on iTunes, join our RSS feed or follow us on Facebook and Twitter:

We’d love to hear your own film recommendations and suggestions for future themes for Movie Marathons. Please get in touch at 101filmsyoushouldhaveseen@gmail.com or leave a comment on the blog. Feel free to say nice things about us on iTunes!

Till Death Do Us Part – Director: Norman Cohen  Year of release: 1969  Studio/Distributor: British Lion Film  Country: UK

On The Buses – Director: Harry Booth  Year of release: 1971  Studio/Distributor: Hammer Film Productions  Country: UK

Dad’s Army Director: Norman Cohen  Year of release: 1971  Studio/Distributor: Norcon Film Productions, Columbia Pictures  Country: UK

Are You Being Served? – Director: Bob Kellet  Year of release: 1977  Studio/Distributor: EMI  Country: UK

The Likely Lads – Director: Michael Tuchner  Year of release: 1976  Studio/Distributor: Anglo-EMI Productions Ltd  Country: UK

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101 Films Movie Marathon 01 – British Sitcoms

New Year (more or less), new podcast format! After talking about it for ages, Lewis and Ian finally do a Movie Marathon; six hours of watching films based around a particular theme. And what better theme is there for the first Movie Marathon than films based on British sitcoms? Yes, that’s right, there were loads of better ideas. But we went for this one!

101 Films Movie Marathon 01 – British Sitcoms

It got serious

A_SeparationIt’s been a long time coming but we finally, FINALLY, got round to watching A Separation. Back in 2012, when we were worrying about Mayan Calendars, London Olympics and Gangnam Style (what a year that was) young Philip Rose recommended we watch A Separation, the first Iranian film to win an Oscar and the critical darling of 2011.

Immeditately we sprang into action. After waiting only 6 months Lewis ordered the film off LoveFilm. Just 7 months later Lewis watched it. Barely two months went by and then I watched it. 101 Films at its most efficient!

Ok, so we were rubbish. The problem was that we just were never in the mood to watch a two hour (subtitled) Iranian film about divorce and the effect it has on the people around the couple. I watched and enjoyed the film and even now that description makes my heart sink a bit. I guess Lew and I are becoming shallow in our old age.

We did enjoy the film though, if finding it a bit hard going, and we hope you enjoy our podcast (we appreciate they can be hard going too).

Our Secret Sponsor for this week is David Hughes (@GroovyFokker). Check out his film reviews at groovyfokker.blogspot.co.uk.

If our review has piqued your interest in the film, you can buy A Separation on DVD or Blu-ray from Amazon by clicking on the links (and we get a little bit of cash if you do – thanks in advance).

Anyway, without further ado, let us present our feature presentation:

Click here to download and listen on your MP3 player of choice:

101 Films Podcast 068 – A Separation

Click below to subscribe on iTunes, join our RSS feed or follow us on Facebook and Twitter:

We’d love to hear your own film recommendations – please get in touch at 101filmsyoushouldhaveseen@gmail.com or leave a comment on the blog. Feel free to say nice things about us on iTunes!

Director:  Asghar Farhadi  Year of release: 2011  Studio/Distributor: Filmiran, Sony Pictures Classics  Country: Iran

Podcast 068: A Separation

The nights are drawing in around 101 Film Towers. Easy to get a bit down when it gets dark at 4:00pm. What can cheer us up? Maybe 2011’s critical hit A Separation? A two hour Iranian film about divorce, illness, old age, class and religion. Well, let’s just say it puts your own problems into perspective.

101 Films Podcast 068 – A Separation

One. Two. Three. Knock on the Wall

ElorfanatoFinally our terrifying journey through October, the spookiest month of all, comes to an end with our last  Halloween special podcast for 2013. After looking at horror in the 1950s with Night of the Demon and in the 1970s with The Wicker Man, we finish with what is considered a modern classic, 2007’s The Orphanage.

The thing that unites all three of the films we’ve watched for Halloween is the fact that the ‘horror’ or scary elements of the story don’t actually seem to be the point of the story. The Night of the Demon was a psychological thriller, whereas The Wicker Man was a, er, folk musical dark comedy. And The Orphanage? A story about how two people deal with the loss of a child.

The film follows Laura played by Belén Rueda. Laura grew up in the titular orphanage and has returned as an adult with her doctor husband Carlos and their adopted son Simón with plans to turn it into a home for children with special needs. Simón starts to talk to apparently invisible children, including one who wears a cloth sack over his face…

Neither Lewis nor I had seen the film before. Knowing it was produced by Guillermo del Toro and being fans of his work, we were looking forward to a beautiful looking film and, if we’re honest, slightly worried about being scared witless by weird, creepy-looking ghost kids. Although gorgeous to look at (and of course it’s the director J. A. Bayona who should get the credit for that), the film wasn’t as scary as we were expecting. Odd and creepy yes, but not exactly terrifying. More than anything the film made me sad, watching Laura trying to cope with the disappearance of Simón and her growing desperation.

We also ended up talking a lot about the plot holes of the film, so if you haven’t seen it, be warned: we spoil the film rotten!

Our Secret Sponsor for this week is Rhidian Davis (@rhidiandavis), who’s currently overseeing the BFI Gothic season (http://www.bfi.org.uk/gothic). There are loads of great screenings coming up over the next couple of months – we urge you to check out the programme.

If our review has piqued your interest in the film, you can buy The Orphanage on DVD or Blu-ray from Amazon by clicking the links (and we get a little bit of cash if you do – thanks in advance).

Anyway, without further ado, let us present our feature presentation:

Click here to download and listen on your MP3 player of choice:

101 Films Podcast 067 – The Orphanage

Click below to subscribe on iTunes, join our RSS feed or follow us on Facebook and Twitter:

We’d love to hear your own film recommendations – please get in touch at 101filmsyoushouldhaveseen@gmail.com or leave a comment on the blog. Feel free to say nice things about us on iTunes!

Director:  J. A. Bayona  Year of release: 2007  Studio/Distributor: Esta Vivo! Laboratorio de Nuevos Talentos, Grupo Rodar, Rodar y Rodar Cine y Televisión, Telecinco Cinema, Televisió de Catalunya (TV3), Warner Bros. Pictures de España, Wild Bunch  Country: Spain and Mexico

Here’s the story of Bonnie and Clyde

Bonnie_and_ClydeIf you were looking for a film that perfectly encapsulated the 1960s then you’d struggle to find a better one than Bonnie and Clyde. Often described as the start of ‘New Hollywood’, Bonnie and Clyde feels, even now, exciting and rule defying. Its stars are young and fresh faced (indeed, Warren Beatty looks almost impossibly young, although Gene Hackman just looks like Gene Hackman), and its anarchic sense of humour is combined with a healthy disrespect for authority. There’s a real sense that anything could happen, that the film was creating something very different to what had gone before.

The film also predicts the souring of the 60s. In 1967, the year the film was released, you could still believe that the world would be changed by cocksure youths who thumbed their collective noses at the man and lived the way THEY wanted to live. Then 1968 comes along and with it assassinations, an ever-worsening Vietnam War, the start of the modern ‘Troubles’ in Northern Ireland and riots in Paris. The optimism came to a violent end, just like our title characters do in the film…

I’d never seen Bonnie and Clyde before and wasn’t really sure what to expect, but as you’ll hear on the podcast, we both enjoyed it immensely. I should warn you that the podcast was recorded in two halves: when we first started recording I wasn’t feeling too good, and we actually had to stop the recording. We then picked it up a week later. Can you spot the join?

Last but not least, our Secret Sponsor for this week is The Movie Waffler (@themoviewaffler). Check out the website at http://www.themoviewaffler.com/.

If our review has piqued your interest in the film, you can buy Bonnie and Clyde from Amazon on DVD or Blu-ray by clicking these links (and we get a little bit of cash if you do – thanks in advance),

Anyway, without further ado, let us present our feature presentation:

Click here to download and listen on your MP3 player of choice:

101 Films Podcast 063 – Bonnie and Clyde

Click below to subscribe on iTunes, join our RSS feed or follow us on Facebook and Twitter:

We’d love to hear your own film recommendations – please get in touch at 101filmsyoushouldhaveseen@gmail.com or leave a comment on the blog. Feel free to say nice things about us on iTunes!

Director: Arthur Penn Year of release: 1967 Studio/Distributor: Warner Bros Country: USA

The World’s End: 101 Films Extra #02

The-Worlds-EndOur second 101 Films Extra, this time with added Lewis! Being big fans of Spaced, Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz, Lewis and I were very much looking forward to The World’s End. Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg back together writing and Nick Frost and Simon Pegg back together on screen. This is going to be great!

To be honest though we were also a little bit worried; what if it turns out to be rubbish? It’s the third of a (Cornetto) trilogy, and we all know how disappointing third films can be (*ahem* Alien 3). There’s nothing worse than something you love going off the boil.

So listen, listener, to our podcast to find out what we think (hint: we love it).

If our review has piqued your interest in the film, you can pre-order The World’s End from Amazon on DVD or Blu-ray by clicking the links (and we get a little bit of cash if you do – thanks in advance).

Anyway, without further ado, let us present our feature presentation:

Click here to download and listen on your MP3 player of choice:

101 Films Extra #02 – The World’s End

Click below to subscribe on iTunes, join our RSS feed or follow us on Facebook and Twitter:

We’d love to hear your own film recommendations – please get in touch at 101filmsyoushouldhaveseen@gmail.com or leave a comment on the blog. Feel free to say nice things about us on iTunes!

Director: Edgar Wright  Year of release: 2013  Studio/Distributor: Relativity Media, Working Title Films, Big Talk Productions, Universal Pictures  Country: UK

I don’t think you have this under control anymore

Diewelle_posterAh, school. Best days of your life. What’s strange is how you find the same sort of people and stories in every school: the ‘cool’ teacher, the misfit kid, the bullies, the couple who acted like they were practically married, the neo-fascistic school project that everyone in your class gets way too involved in, eventually leading to a violent showdown in a hall…

Yes, this week Lewis and I take a look at 2008’s The Wave (or Die Welle in Germany). Recommended by listener Jason Morgan, The Wave is a German film based on a social experiment from 1967. Ron Jones, a teacher in California, created a quasi-fascist group in a school to show how totalitarian beliefs can take root in Western society. The experiment had to be shut down as it proved too successful, with students taking the system much more seriously than Ron predicted.

The Wave transports the premise to modern-day Germany, and follows a group of typical teenagers during the course of the week-long experiment, showing how it changes them and the way they relate to each other and others outside the group.

Lewis and I found the idea of the film fascinating, but found the film as a whole a bit ‘TV movie’. Still, the performances are great and the idea has such power that there’s much to enjoy and find interesting.

Our Secret Sponsor for this week is yet ANOTHER Film Blog/Podcast. We’re fools to ourselves. Still, we recommend you check out Love Your Movies. You can follow them on @thedvdgen or read their blog at loveyourmovies.com.

If our review has piqued your interest in the film, you can buy The Wave DVD from Amazon by clicking here (and we get a little bit of cash if you do – thanks in advance)

Anyway, without further ado, let us present our feature presentation:

Click here to download and listen on your MP3 player of choice:

101 Films Podcast 060 – The Wave

Click below to subscribe on iTunes, join our RSS feed or follow us on Facebook and Twitter:

We’d love to hear your own film recommendations – please get in touch at 101filmsyoushouldhaveseen@gmail.com or leave a comment on the blog. Feel free to say nice things about us on iTunes!

Director: Dennis Gansel  Year of release: 2008  Studio/Distributor: Rat Pack Filmproduktion  Country: Germany